William Noyes

b. circa 1473, d. circa 1528
     William Noyes was born circa 1473 in Weyhill, Hampshire, England.1 He was the son of John/Robert Noyes. William Noyes died circa 1528 in England.1
      Paul Noyes write: "Born say 1473; died ca. 1528, about which time his son William is stated to have begun occupying land belonging to the Rectory of Urchfont. William was mentioned in the Court Rolls of Urchfont in 1498; he was farming the manor of Urchfont in 1510/11, and was named as a juror there on 15 April 1512. In 1513, he held the manor and rectory of Urchfont of the Abbess of St. Mary, Winchester, and still occupied the demesne lands and rectory in 1518. He was first in a view of frankpledge at "Erchfont" 11 April 8 Henry VIII [1517], was mentioned also in 1519 and 1520, and ws listed at "Ercheffounte" in the subsidy of 14 + 15 Henry VIII [1523-24].
Robert Noyes, gentleman, has kept and pastured in Inlandes 5 horses, as if belonging to the Rectory of Erchfount; George Mortimer, occupier of the demesne lands of the manor belonging to site of manor or capital messuage, has pastured and kept 21 horses as in right of said demesne; and whereas William Noyes who had held and occupied as well the said demesne land as the land of the Rectory for 30 years in I Elizabeth, and before him William Noyes his father, grandfather of said Robert Noyes, occupied the same for many years, and Robert Noyes himself for 28 years past, and put only 21 horses on the said common pasture, the Inlands, one of them oppresses the pasture with foresaid horses; and at the next court the truth thereof is to be presented. [ADD ROLL 19,736 View of Frankpledge and Court at Erchfount 12 April, 31 Elizabeth]."1

Citations

  1. [S29] Paul Noyes' research, online noyes.rootsweb.com.
Last Edited=24 Apr 2005

Robert Noyes

b. circa 1490, d. date unknown
     Robert Noyes was born circa 1490 in Littleton, Kimpton, Hampshire, England.1 He was the son of Robert Noyes and Joan Mondey. His death date has not been found. He died in Littleton, Kimpton, Hampshire, England.

Citations

  1. [S29] Paul Noyes' research, online noyes.rootsweb.com.
Last Edited=22 Nov 2006

John Noyes

b. circa 1494, d. before 21 June 1538
     John Noyes was born circa 1494 in Littleton, Kimpton, Hampshire, England.1 He was the son of Robert Noyes and Joan Mondey. John Noyes died before 21 June 1538 in Littleton, Kimpton, Hampshire, England.1

Citations

  1. [S29] Paul Noyes' research, online noyes.rootsweb.com.
Last Edited=19 Aug 2001

William Noyes

b. circa 1492, d. before 1546
     William Noyes was born circa 1492 in Littleton, Kimpton, Hampshire, England.1 He was the son of Robert Noyes and Joan Mondey. William Noyes died before 1546 in Littleton, Kimpton, Hampshire, England.1

Citations

  1. [S29] Paul Noyes' research, online noyes.rootsweb.com.
Last Edited=19 Aug 2001

Thomas Noyes1

b. circa 1517, d. before 1579
     Thomas Noyes was born circa 1517 in Cholderton, Wiltshire, England.1 He was the son of Nicholas Noyes and Agnes (?) Thomas Noyes died before 1579 in Littleton, Kimpton, Hampshire, England.1

Citations

  1. [S29] Paul Noyes' research, online noyes.rootsweb.com.
Last Edited=19 Aug 2001

Albon Noyes1

b. circa 1521, d. date unknown
     Albon Noyes was born circa 1521 in Littleton, Kimpton, Hampshire, England.1 Albon Noyes was the child of Nicholas Noyes and Agnes (?) His death date has not been found. He died in England.

Citations

  1. [S29] Paul Noyes' research, online noyes.rootsweb.com.
Last Edited=22 Nov 2006

Robert Noyes1

b. 1570, d. 20 January 1659
     Robert Noyes was born in 1570 in Cholderton, Wiltshire, England.2,1 He was the son of Robert William Noyes and Joan Attridge. Robert Noyes died on 20 January 1659 in Cholderton, Wiltshire, England.2,1 He was buried in Cholderton, Wiltshire, England.2,1

Citations

  1. [S558] James Atkins Noyes, "Noyes Pedigree."
  2. [S29] Paul Noyes' research, online noyes.rootsweb.com.
Last Edited=21 Aug 2005

Richard Noyes

b. circa 1572, d. after 25 August 1639
     Richard Noyes was born circa 1572 in Cholderton, Wiltshire, England.1 He was the son of Robert William Noyes and Joan Attridge. Richard Noyes died after 25 August 1639 in Cholderton, Wiltshire, England.1
     He left a will on 25 August 1639.2

Citations

  1. [S29] Paul Noyes' research, online noyes.rootsweb.com.
  2. [S558] James Atkins Noyes, "Noyes Pedigree."
Last Edited=24 Jan 2004

Robert Darvell1

b. circa 1616, d. 26 February 1661/62
     Robert Darvell was born circa 1616 in England.1 He was the son of John Darvell. Robert Darvell married Hester (?) before 1636. Robert Darvell died on 26 February 1661/62 in Sudbury, Massachusetts Bay Colony.1,2
     "Darvall, Darvill, or Darvell, Robert, Sudbury, an orig propr d 26 Feb 1662, had Eliz, and by w Esther had Mary, b 10 May 1642, and Dorothy, nam in the will of their gr.f of 16 Jan 1662, in wh. he gave the mo. 5 and 1/2 acres of ld. at Norchurch in Co Herts "commonly call Harrot's end "Eliz hid d perhaps by a former u. m at S 30 Nov 1654, the sec Peter Noyes He also names d Mary D wh m that yr Joseph Noyes, neph of Peter."

Children of Robert Darvell and Hester (?)

Citations

  1. [S29] Paul Noyes' research, online noyes.rootsweb.com.
  2. [S750] Early VR Middlesex Co. MA (published), Vital Records of Sudbury.
  3. [S736] Great Migration Online, online www.greatmigrationonline.org.
Last Edited=22 Dec 2007

Hester (?)1

b. circa 1618, d. 4 February 1660/61
     Hester (?) was born circa 1618 in England.1 She married Robert Darvell, son of John Darvell, before 1636. Hester (?) died on 4 February 1660/61 in Sudbury, Massachusetts Bay Colony.1,2
     Hester was also known as Esther (?)

Children of Hester (?) and Robert Darvell

Citations

  1. [S29] Paul Noyes' research, online noyes.rootsweb.com.
  2. [S750] Early VR Middlesex Co. MA (published), Vital Records of Sudbury.
Last Edited=22 Jan 2007

Mary Duntser1

b. before 15 December 1630, d. 28 December 1715
     Mary Duntser was born before 15 December 1630 in England She was the daughter of Robert and Mary (Garrett) Dunster.2 She married as her first husband Major Simon Willard, son of Richard Willard and Margery Humphrie, in 1652 They had eight children.2,1 Mary Duntser married Deacon Joseph Noyes, son of Rev. James Noyes and Sarah Brown, on 14 July 1680 in Sudbury, Massachusetts Bay Colony.3,1 Mary Duntser died on 28 December 1715 in Sudbury, Province of Massachusetts Bay.2,3

Citations

  1. [S736] Great Migration Online, online www.greatmigrationonline.org.
  2. [S29] Paul Noyes' research, online noyes.rootsweb.com.
  3. [S750] Early VR Middlesex Co. MA (published), Vital records of Sudbury.
Last Edited=22 Dec 2007

Thomas Noyes1

b. circa 1563, d. before 10 July 1627
     Thomas Noyes was born circa 1563 in Weyhill, Hampshire, England.1 He was the son of Peter Noyes and Edith Blake. Thomas Noyes married Dorothy (?) before 1588 in England. Thomas Noyes died before 10 July 1627 in Charleton, England.1
     He left a will on 15 May 1623. Thomas Noyes of Charleton in the parish of Andever in the countie of South[amp]t[on] yeoman, sick of body, left money towards the repair of the parish church of Andover and the poor of the parish, and 12s to each of his godchildren. To his wife Dorothy he left "one joyned bed with the furniture therunto belonginge" and specified that after his decease she should have and enjoy "two yarde landes with tenem[en]ts therunto belonginge... according to the costome of the manner of Ramridge duering the Term of her widowhood," permitting his eldest son Peter Noyes to have the profits thereof. His younger son Thomas Noyes was to provide Dorothy with houseroom, lodging, and "wholsome sustenance meat and drinke" or £10 yearly. To Thomas he left his lease in certain lands held of the Right Honourable William Lord Sandes in Charleton., and another lease held of Sir Edward BArret Knight in Charleton. To his son Peter Noyes and daughters, Ann, Frances, and Dorothy Waterman, he left 20s apiece, and the same sum to his son and daughter-in-law [stepchildren] Edward Blake and MArie Scullard, and his nephew John Francis. The residue was to go to his younger son Thomas, who was to serve as executor. He entreated loving Brother Mr. Peter Noyes and loving Cosen Mr. William Noyes of Ramridge and loving son-in-law John Blake to be ov[er]seers, aiding the executor. Witnesses were John Blake and Edward Blake, both of whom signed, and John Mercer [his mark].1 His will was proved/probated on 10 July 1627 The inventory was dated 6 July 1627.
Administration of the will was granted to his son Thomas Noyes the younger.1

Paul Noyes wrote: "Settled at Charleton, in the parish of Andover. He was listed in the subsidy of Charleton Tithing in 1594 and Enham Rege (King's Enham) Tithing in 1598. Ramridge Court Rolls indicate that Thomas Noyse was fined 6d for neglecting his hedges on 28 June 1592. He was a juror at the courts held 15 June 1587, 6 June 1588, and 28 June 1592.1 "

Children of Thomas Noyes and Dorothy (?)

Citations

  1. [S29] Paul Noyes' research, online noyes.rootsweb.com.
Last Edited=24 Apr 2005

Dorothy (?)1

b. circa 1562, d. before 27 February 1633
     Dorothy (?) was born circa 1562 in England. She married as her first husband Nicholas Blake before 1587. Dorothy (?) married as her second husband Thomas Noyes, son of Peter Noyes and Edith Blake, before 1588 in England. Dorothy (?) died before 27 February 1633 in England.1 She was buried on 27 February 1632/33 in Andover, Hampshire, England.1

Children of Dorothy (?) and Thomas Noyes

Citations

  1. [S29] Paul Noyes' research, online noyes.rootsweb.com.
Last Edited=2 Apr 2005

Peter Noyes1

b. circa 1517, d. after 1586
     Peter Noyes was born circa 1517 in Weyhill, Hampshire, England.1 He was the son of Thomas Noyes and Dennys (?) Peter Noyes married Edith Blake before 1536.1 Peter Noyes died after 1586.1
      Paul Noyes wrote: "Peter first appeared in the lay subsidies at Penton Grafton [Weyhill] in 36 Henry VIII [1544/5] and 37 Henry VIII [1545/6] when he was taxed for £10 in goods. He was again taxed for this amount in 1 Edw. VI [1547/8], 3 Edw. VI [1549/50], 4 Edw. VI [1550/1, and 5 Edw. VI [1551/2], but his goods were valued at only £5 in 6 Edw. VI 1552/3. He was taxed for £15 in goods in the subsidy of 1571 and £10 in 1586, but his name did not appear in the subsidies of 1594 or 1599, indicating his death before 1594.
Peter Noyes and others were presented at court on 1 April 1557 for not ringing their pigs. On 10 October 1559, the Court Baron of Ramridge ordered the tenants not to pasture their cattle in the Ryding and the Pykem, now in the tenure of Peter Noyes, farmer there, without Peter's permission. The tenants had claimed common pasture. Christopher Rookes, clerk, rector of Weyhill, surrendered a messuage and half a virgate of land called Stiles to the use of Peter Noyes on 8 April 1561. Peter took the same to hold to him and his sons Richard and Peter, to the longest liver (Peter had just been born). Peter Noyes (Sr.) was presented at the court baron on 26 April 1568 for not making his hedge. In what was basically a renewal of the previous lease for lives, intended to include his most recently born son, Thomas, he appeared again before the court on 8 June 1574, surrendering the messuage and half a virgat of land called Styles, late in the tenure of Richard Wyntrey, clark, to the use of Richard, Thomas, and Peter (the younger) Noyse and the longest liver of them.

Peter Noyes received the manor of Ramridge as his share of his inheritance from his father. RAmridge must have been worth more than Blissmore Hall - or he farmed it more successfully - as his brother Robert Noyse was taxed for only £6 in goods in 1571 and Robert's heir William was taxed for o[nly £4 in goods in 1586 - less than half the amount for which Peter was taxed. In 1594, Peter's son and heir William "Noice" was taxed for £14 in goods and for £11 in 1598. In 1594, William Noice "jun" [of Blissmore Hall] was taxed for only £4 in goods, and in 1598, "Mrs. Nyse of Blissmore Hall" was taxed for £4 in goods.

Peter Noyes had been a benevolent lord to the tenants of his manor. After his death, those same tenants brought suit against William Noyes "father and son" of Ramridge manor. In depositions dated 9 July 4 James I [1606] and 22 and 23 April 5 JAmes I [1607], it was stated that the Noyes family held the manor of Ramridge, which was part of the possessions of the Almhouse of Elwelme, including lands in Penton Grafton, Nutbeame, and Glanvill or Glanfield. The tenants complained that they had been allowed to pasture cattle in certain fields and to use a pond to water their animals, but that William Noyes, after succeeding to the manor, denied them those privileges. Furthermore, William had set up a lodge with a keeper in it on the tenants' common. He allowed an increase in the rabbit population so the tenants no longer had sufficient pannage for their pigs. And they no longer had brushwood for fuel and hedge mending. These were very real and important issues to the comfort of their daily lives.

The tenants also claimed that William was allowing the buildings to decay and collapse. The timber was no longer supplied free of charge for repairing tenants' houses and outbuildings, as it had been by Peter Noyes, and the woodreeve was no longer chosen by the tenants. William Noyes was also putting up hedges and ditches, impeding what they believed to be dreaded enclosures that became a main battle theme between lord and tenants during this period. "Ould" Peter Noyes, "who used to use the tenants very kindly," did not charge the tenanta for the release of impounded animals. He had replenished the woods and coppices for some fifty years, and had stored them with the "game of conies." Peter Noyes was stated to be the father of William Noyes the elder. Robert Same, aged sixty, who was born within two miles of the farmhouse, stated he never knew any other farmer than Peter Noyes the father and William Noyes the elder "that synce now dwelleth there with William his son for they ever had it in their name synce he this deponent was of understanding." Peter Noyes, gentleman, of Andover, aged forty-five, also testified, but he managed not to say much of anything one way or another.

An important point that emerges from this suit is that there must have been three generations of William Noyeses at Ramridge, rather than two, after "ould" Peter Noyes. When William Noyes "the father" , born about 1541/2, was stated to be dwelling at Ramridge "with William his son," this would refer to an adult William under whose care the old man was living, not a young son age about fourteen. The elder William's son William, must have been born about 1562, as he married the heiress Joan Bacon in 1581, when both were in their late teens. It is understandable that as both the younger William Noyes and Joan BAcon were heirs of important estates their marriage would have been arranged well in advance. Such an arrangement would explain what would otherwise seem uncomfortably tight chronology. The eldest William Noyes was buried at Weyhill 24 July 1626. His administration was granted to his relict, Hellene, on 2 October 1626. The administration of William Noyes "sen" [the first William's son], late of Ramridge, was granted to his daughter Catherine Noyse (corrected in the margin to Catherine, wife of Ambrose Prewett) on 6 February 1629/30. But the son and heir of Joan BAcon, William Noyes, was alive and aged forty when she died in 1631 - a fact that forces the conclusion that there must have been two generations of William Noyeses of Ramridge between "ould" Peter Noyes and the William baptized at Weyhill on 15 October 1592.

The Court of Requests cases prove that William Noyes of Ramridge was son of Peter Noyes. Peter was also stated in two pedigrees of the family to be father of Peter Noyes of Andover. The wills of both Agnes (Noyes) Scullard and her husband, John Skullaard, gentleman, call Mr. Peter Noyes of Andover her brother. And Thomas Noyes, in his will, makes "my loving Brother Mr. Peter Noyes and my loving Cosen [nephew] Mr. William Noyes of Ramridge" his overseers. Taken together, these references provide proof of the relationships.

There may have been two other siblings as well. A Robert Noyes had a son buried at Weyhill 23 December 1565 and a son John baptized there 25 June 1568, and a Henry Noyes married Joan Wale at Weyhill 2 November 1595 and had his own family. It is also possible that this Robert was son of Robert Noyes of Blissmore Hall, Peter Noyes' brother. Without more information, it is impossible to determine what might be their correct placement in the family."1

Children of Peter Noyes and Edith Blake

Citations

  1. [S29] Paul Noyes' research, online noyes.rootsweb.com.
Last Edited=11 Apr 2005

Edith Blake1

b. circa 1519, d. before 17 January 1584
     Edith Blake was born circa 1519 in England. She married Peter Noyes, son of Thomas Noyes and Dennys (?), before 1536.1 Edith Blake died before 17 January 1584 in England. She was buried on 17 January 1583/84 in Weyhill, Hampshire, England.1

Children of Edith Blake and Peter Noyes

Citations

  1. [S29] Paul Noyes' research, online noyes.rootsweb.com.
Last Edited=19 Aug 2001

Thomas Noyes1

b. circa 1488, d. 1553
     Thomas Noyes was born circa 1488 in England.1 He was the son of Thomas Noyes. Thomas Noyes married Dennys (?) before 1517.1 Thomas Noyes died in 1553 in England.1
     He left a will on 5 February 1553.1 His will was proved/probated on 19 January 1554.1

Paul Noyes wrote: "Thomas Noyes was born say 1488, and definitely before 1503, and may have been an only child. He died between 5 February 155[3/]4 and 19 January 1554/5. Thomas Noyes of Ramridge, in the parish of Weyhill, was taxed for £40 in goods 15 Henry VIII [1523/4]. Thomas Noyse was taxed for £40 in goods at Penton Grafton in the subsidies of 36 and 37 Henry VIII [1544/5 and 1545/6], but only £30 in goods 1 Edw. VI [1547/8] and 3 Edw. VI [1549/50]. The following year (4 Edw. VI [1550/1]), his goods were valued at £24, and by 6 Edw. VI [1552/3] - by which time he had conveyed a substantial portion of his estate to his son Robert and grandson John - only £10. Thomas Noyes is recorded as serving on a jury of inquiry at Collingbourne Kingston on 20 April 37 Henry VIII [1546] with Thomas Corderoy and William Sotewell, both of Chute.

Thomas Noyes was mentioned with his cousins, the children of his uncle Robert Noyes, in several suits concerning the entail of the manor of Littleton in the parish of Kimpton. In a suit before the Court of Requests, it was recorded that "Jone Noyes, widow [of Robert, Sr.], Robert Noyes [Jr.], Wyll[ia]m Noyes, John Noyes the brother of the said Robert, Nych[o]las Noyes, Thomas Noyes, Emma wife of the said Robert, John Noyes son of the said Robert, Jone Noyes and Anne Noyes daughters of the said Robert" leased the manor of Lytleton with appurtenances from the Abbot of the Monastary of St. Peters of Gloucester. This transaction took place 4 April 15 Henry VIII [1524] and was for the term of 61 years. The record goes on to say that Thomas Noyes and all but the children of Robert were of majority. On 16 July 24 Henry VIII [1532], another deed was drawn up leasing the manor to "joan Noyes the widow, Robert Noyes, Emme, John Noyes the son, Jone the daughter and Anne Noyes, and Margery, Agnes, Mary, Ede and Cecely, daughters of Robert and Emme [born since the previous contract]," to hold for a period of 70 years so long as they should live. Nicholas St. John countered that Joan Noyes, widow, and Robert meant to defraud William, John, and Nicholas Noyes, "the brethren of Robert," and Thomas Noyes. Nicholas Seyntjohn had purchased the rights from various parties to the first lease. Nicholas Noyes and Thomas Noyes granted their interest to him at "Remrygge" [Ramridge], Hampshire. It was after purchasing those rights that Nicholas Seyntjohn attempted to enter the manor forcibly. The suit in question was apparently dated 22 June 6 Edward VI [1552]. Robert Annetts, of Vyfylde [Fifield], Hants., husbandman, aged 52, deposed that he knew Robert Noyes, "father of Robert Noyes," who had taken a lease of the manor of Lytylton long before the above mentioned leases. He leased the manor as "Robert Noyes the father," with Jone his wife, Willm Noyes, John Noyes, Nicholas Noyes, Robarte Noyes now Complainant and to Thomas Noyes cousin of Roberte Noyes the father." This deposition proves the relationship of Thomas Noyes to the others.

At the time of the suit, the term "cousin" meant an uncle/nephew relationship as readily as it would mean cousin in the way we now interpret the term. Chronology forces the conclusion that Thomas must be the elder Robert's nephew. If the relationship were further distant, it is very unlikely that Thomas would have been included in the entail of the manor with Robert and his children, or that he would be included after Robert's death when his widow Jone renewed the lease. The most logical conclusion is that Thomas was the only surviving male issue of Robert's deceased brother, and that Robert had been protecting his nephew's interests as his guardian. Robert's brother William and his family were already well provided for, so there was no reason to include them. Thomas was the male heir of the family.

Thomas Noyes and his descendants acquired both the manor of Ramridge and the manor of Blissmore Hall in the parish of Weyhill (also known as Penton Grafton). The manors were important because it was on their grounds that the annual fair was held. Weyhill Fair, "one of the largest and most celebrated in England," was held for three days, from September 28 through 30. It brought the "lord of the manor of Weyhill and others...substantial profits... In the great days of the fair 140, 000 sheep were sometimes sold in a day... It drew folk from all parts of the country, insomuch that in 1665 it was deemed expedient to forbid its being held for fear of spreading the plague.

The manors of Ramridge and Blissmore Hall appear in later records to be distinctly separate, but the Fair was held partly on Blissmore Hall Acre, partly on lands belonging to Ramridge, and partly on the parish glebe. Thomas Noyes was farmer of the manor of Ramridge by 1552/3, by which time his son Robert occupied Blissmore Hall. It was in that year that Thomas conveyed "goods, chattels and household stuff" to his grandson, John, son of Robert, who was then "about some dozen years of age." John made a deposition stating these facts on 31 May 42 Eliz. I [1600], and listing the specific goods that had been conveyed to him by his grandfather. Those goods were given to his father Robert and carried in a cart from Ramridge, where his grandfather Thomas was "then farmer," to Blissmore Hall, where John's father Robert "then dwelt," along with cattle Thomas had given both Robert and John. Thomas charged Robert that John should receive the goods at age twenty, but John had never received them (John stated that the goods, chattels and household stuff were worth £40). At Roberts death, John "did fully and absolutely give" his right in these things to Peter Noyes, his son. Peter discharged and acquitted his uncle, William Noyes, John's brother, who was Robert's sole executor, in consideration whereof William conveyed the remainder of his estate in Blissmore Hall to Peter after William's death. Peter was also to give William's two daughters 24 marks when he received the farm.

Alexander Bolton, as Master of the Almhouse or Hospital of Ewelme, Oxford, brought suit against Thomas Noyes' son Robert, trying to regain control of the manor of Ramridge and Weyhill Fair. Master Bolton claimed "the manor of Ramryge otherwise called Weyhill" to be theirs, including "one parcel of ground containing one acre in Weyhill together with the profits of one certain fair there kept yearly by the space of three days, that is to say, the day of the feast of St. Michael the Archangel, the day before and the day after the same feast." He claimed they had been seised of it until 8 Henry VIII [1517/18], when John Rogers of Bryanston, Dorset, Esquire, fought for right of the manor with the Master of the Almhouse at that time. Master Bolton claimed they won the dispute, but had to admit that "one Robert Noyes claiming and pretending by and from John Rogers to have some feigned interest of and in the parcel of ground, and of and in the profits of the fairs" was then in possession of the manor. Robert Noyes replied: That Syr John Rogers late of Branston co. Dorcester [Dorset] knight was in his life time... seized of one tenement called Blissmore Hall Farm within the parish of Weyhill co. Southt' and of one acre of ground in Weyhill, the east end of the acre bounding upon the parish church of Weyhill and the west end of the acre bounding upon the toll booth and of all other profits of the same during the time of any fair holden or kept upon Weyhill, And Sir John Rogers... 33 years since or there-abouts did let the tenement called Blissmore Hall and other the premises to Thomas Noyes the father of the defendant for certain years yet enduring, By virtue whereof Thomas Noyes the father entered Into the tenement and other the premises... And furthermore the defendant saith that by the space of 19 years (at the least) or thereabouts Thomas Noyes the father and his assigns and the defendant himself by virtue of the lease have always occupied taken and enjoyed the acre and the profits and casualties of the booths and fairs upon the acre ever since the lease without let or interruption...

The Noyes family were apparently successful in their point, as they continued to reside in the manors.

Thomas Noyse and his son Robert also had a violent feud with a local man named John Baker. It was precipitated by a suit Thomas Noyse brought against Baker in the Court of Requests, charging him with letting cattle graze on certain grounds belonging to the manor of Blissmore Hall and Weyhill. John Baker answered: long...before the complainant [Thomas Noyes] any thing had in the Manor of Ramridge, one John Rogers knight now dead was seized in his demesne as of fee of and in the manor of Blysmere Hall...with all...profits and commodities...belonging with all...their appurtenances, And he so being seised all other whose estate John Baker now hath for term of certain years yet induring in the manor of Blysmerehall, hath had and taken the stallage and pycage and other profits of a fair yearly kept at the feast of St. Michael the Archangel at a place called Weehyll...time out of mind of man in the right of the same John Rogers without interruption And without that...the defendant at any time with his cattle and sheep wrongfully depastured and consumed the grass of [Thomas Noyse]...upon any parcel of land belonging to the manor of Remrigge or that he pretendeth the same to be parcel of the manor or farm of Blysmerhall...or that he doth intend to continue any such unlawful doings or hurts which should be to the utter undoing of [Thomas Noyes]...

Before this suit was brought to the Court of Requests, Thomas Noyse had apparently received an order from Sir William Pawlett (who presided over the Southampton assizes) ordering John Baker to suffer and permit Thomas Noyse to quietly occupy a certain parcel of land in Weyhill. John Baker also denied threatening "any frays or manslaughter...to be committed." Thomas Noyse answered in replication that he ws ready to prove all these things in court. John Baker later brought a bill of complaint against Thomas Noyse and his son Robert in the Court of Star Chamber, claiming they were keeping harlots in the parsonage. Thomas and Robert Noyse answered: that before the feast of St. Michael the Archangel last past...Robert Noyse...hired [of] Thomas Launcelyn parson of Wey[hill] the parsonage of Wey[hill] for the term of one year...Robert before the feast, did license John Gese to occupy the mansion house of the parsonage during the time of the fair, And that the Thursday...before the feast of St. Michael the Archangel last past...about 5 of the clock at after noon...[John Baker] came into the mansion house and diverse suspect persons with him...

Sir Thomas Lysley had commissioned John Baker "to make search throughout the fair for vagabonds and harlots." Baker apparently used the opportunity to go to the parsonage when Robert Noyse happened to be visiting. Robert denied that he had commanded John Gese to keep suspect persons "nor ill rule in the liberty of Robert Noyse, 'What hast thou to do here to forbid any man the house being none of thine." A strange reaction for a man charged with doing what Robert had just requested! Robert told him "he had to do there for he paid the rent for the same." At this, John Baker "with opprobrious words given to Robert Noyse" struck Robert with his bill, and then struck Robert on the side of his forehead [so] "that the blood ran out." Then John Baker stabbed Robert in the head with his woodknife. In this "evil demeanor," John Baker was put out of the house and the doors shut against him. He shouted that if Robert Noyse wouldn't let him in, he would break down the doors or windows. He then broke through one of the windows and "put in the window the harlot called Besse Sylverpynne," saying "he would thrust his dagger to the heart of Robert Noyse wheresoever he met him." He continued, ranting that he would set the house on fire unless Robert let him in.. After this Robert Noyse caused John BAker "to be truly indicted thereof before the King's Justice in the said County of Southampton" and bound for keeping the King's Peace. Robert denied the charge of John Baker that his tenant John Gese willingly supported and kept harlots in the parsonage or any suspect persons, or that by his support "kept any abominable or unthrifty rule in the parsonage," or that Robert Noyse "did company with the harlots and vagabonds." Robert also stated that he hadn't had any coat or doublet to defend himself, and denied making any unlawful resistance. He also denied that he or Thomas Noyse had out of malice pursued John Baker and caused him to be indicted, "or that Robert Noyse or his adherents did beat, hurt and evil intreat [John Baker] contrary to the King's peace and laws." Robert also denied the charge that he and Thomas Noyse "have always intended the destruction or undoing" of John Baker "or else for vexation and malice caused [John Baker] to be arrested [and] bound to the peace before the King's Justices of the Peace in the county of Southampton." (It would have been even more remarkable, after having been so attacked, if Robert and Thomas Noyse had not brought suit against John Baker to keep the King's Peace, maliciously or no.)

It would appear that Thomas Noyse had disposed of most of his goods and lands before the time of his death, including cattle.

His will was proved 19 January 1554/5 and administration granted to the executrix, his wife. The undated inventory taken by John Dorma, Robert Noyse [the testator's son], and Richard Fuller totaled only £9:5:4, including 26 sheep, two kine, and personal effects."1

Children of Thomas Noyes and Dennys (?)

Citations

  1. [S29] Paul Noyes' research, online noyes.rootsweb.com.
Last Edited=24 Apr 2005

Dennys (?)1

b. circa 1492, d. after 19 January 1554
     Dennys (?) was born circa 1492 in England. She married Thomas Noyes, son of Thomas Noyes, before 1517.1 Dennys (?) died after 19 January 1554 in England.1

Children of Dennys (?) and Thomas Noyes

Citations

  1. [S29] Paul Noyes' research, online noyes.rootsweb.com.
Last Edited=19 Aug 2001

Isaac Read1,2,3,4

b. 23 February 1703/4, d. May 1780
     Isaac Read was born on 23 February 1703/4 in Sudbury, Province of Massachusetts Bay.1,3,4 He was the son of Thomas Read and Mary Bigelow.3,4,5 Isaac Read married Experience Willis, daughter of Samuel Willis and Susanna Gleason, on 11 February 1729/30 in Sudbury, Province of Massachusetts Bay.1,2,3,4 Isaac Read died in May 1780 in Sudbury, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, at age 76.1,4 He was buried on 28 May 1780 in Sudbury, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.1,4
     He left a will on 15 May 1780 in Sudbury, Massachusetts Bay Colony.6

Children of Isaac Read and Experience Willis

Citations

  1. [S29] Paul Noyes' research, online noyes.rootsweb.com.
  2. [S300] Edmund Rice Website, online www.widowmaker.com/~gwk/era.
  3. [S750] Early VR Middlesex Co. MA (published), Vital Records of Sudbury.
  4. [S789] Frances McTeer and Frederick C. Warner, "The Willis Family."
  5. [S1186] Winifred Fahey Pelley, Lindsey Reese Bailey, Winsor Bruce, Laura Lindquist Fahey, Miriam Rudd Rudd and Catherine Rose Fahey, "Thomas Bruce of Sudbury."
  6. [S1132] Will.
Last Edited=10 Feb 2016

Experience Willis1,2

b. circa 1707, d. before 6 August 1787
     Experience Willis was born circa 1707 in Sudbury, Province of Massachusetts Bay.3,2 She was the daughter of Samuel Willis and Susanna Gleason.2 Experience Willis was baptized on 10 April 1709.2 She married Isaac Read, son of Thomas Read and Mary Bigelow, on 11 February 1729/30 in Sudbury, Province of Massachusetts Bay.3,1,4,2 Experience Willis died before 6 August 1787 in Sudbury, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.2 She was buried on 6 August 1787 in Sudbury, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.2

Children of Experience Willis and Isaac Read

Citations

  1. [S300] Edmund Rice Website, online www.widowmaker.com/~gwk/era.
  2. [S789] Frances McTeer and Frederick C. Warner, "The Willis Family."
  3. [S29] Paul Noyes' research, online noyes.rootsweb.com.
  4. [S750] Early VR Middlesex Co. MA (published), Vital Records of Sudbury.
Last Edited=23 Jan 2007

Johnathan Fassett1,2,3

b. 15 March 1741/42, d. 29 May 1834
     Johnathan Fassett was born on 15 March 1741/42 in Lexington, Province of Massachusetts Bay.2,3 He was the son of Joseph Fassett and Amity Willard.2,3 Johnathan Fassett was baptized on 28 March 1742 in Lexington, Province of Massachusetts Bay.2 He married Sarah Davis, daughter of Eleazer Davis and Rebecca Chandler, on 27 October 1761 in Bedford, Province of Massachusetts Bay.1,4,5,3 Johnathan Fassett died on 29 May 1834 in Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 92.3,6,7 He was buried in Old Burial Ground, Boylston, Worcester County, Massachusetts.6,8

Children of Johnathan Fassett and Sarah Davis

Citations

  1. [S29] Paul Noyes' research, online noyes.rootsweb.com.
  2. [S750] Early VR Middlesex Co. MA (published), Vital Records of Lexington.
  3. [S848] Katherine Fassett Schuster, Fassett Genealogy.
  4. [S278] Charles H. Chandler, Desc. of Roger Chandler.
  5. [S750] Early VR Middlesex Co. MA (published), VR of Acton.
  6. [S976] Donna Marie Fawcett, "Email from Donna Fawcet Hopper," e-mail to Ann Gulbransen, 7 March, 2007.
  7. [S145] VR of Massachusetts (published).
  8. [S653] Biography/Burial Data, online www.findagrave.com.
  9. [S830] Early VR Worcester Co. MA (published).
  10. [S830] Early VR Worcester Co. MA (published), Vital records of Shrewsbury.
Last Edited=10 May 2013

Jane Clarke1,2

b. 20 October 1591, d. 2 December 1661
     Jane Clarke was born on 20 October 1591 in London, London, England.3 She was the daughter of John Clarke and Elizabeth Hobson. Jane Clarke married William Collier, son of Abraham Collier, on 16 May 1611 in St. Olave, Southwark, Surrey, England.4 Jane Clarke died on 2 December 1661 in Plymouth, Plymouth Colony, now Plymouth County, Massachusetts, at age 70.3
     She and William Collier immigrated , arriving 1633 in Plymouth, Plymouth Colony, now Plymouth County, Massachusetts. Their children Mary, Rebecca, Sarah and Elizabeth traveled with them.4

Children of Jane Clarke and William Collier

Citations

  1. Don Dickenson says her name was Jane Curtis.
  2. [S1152] Barbara Lambert Merrick, MF 24 Brewster.
  3. [S114] Don Dickenson's Home Page, online www.familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/d/i/c/Donald-R-Dickenson.
  4. [S48] The Great Migration.
  5. [S54] Eugene Aubrey Stratton, Plymouth Colony, Its History and People 1620-1691.
Last Edited=7 Feb 2015

Augusta Sophia Miles1,2

b. 12 February 1819, d. date unknown
     Augusta Sophia Miles was born on 12 February 1819 in Massachusetts.3,2 She married Isaac Reed Noyes , son of Asahel Noyes and Abigail Fassett, after 1852.2 Her death date has not been found.
     Augusta Sophia Miles and Isaac Reed Noyes appeared on the 1860 Federal census of Morris Township, Morris County, New Jersey, enumerated July 1860.3

Citations

  1. [S29] Paul Noyes' research, online noyes.rootsweb.com.
  2. [S553] Miles genealogy, online.
  3. [S670] 1860 United States Federal Census, NJ, Roll M653_703. book 1, p. 126.
Last Edited=22 Nov 2006

Ebenezer Drury1,2

b. 10 March 1770, d. 15 November 1852
     Ebenezer Drury was born on 10 March 1770 in Temple, Province of New Hampshire.3 He was the son of Ebenezer Drury and Hannah Keyes.3 Ebenezer Drury married Lucy Flint, daughter of Dr. Edward Flint and Mary Howe, on 3 January 1793 in Shrewsbury, Worcester County, Massachusetts.4,5,1 Ebenezer Drury died on 15 November 1852 in Shrewsbury, Worcester County, Massachusetts, at age 82.6,7
     He and Lucy Flint appeared on the 1850 Federal census of Shrewsbury, Worcester County, Massachusetts, enumerated 7 September 1850 He was living in the household of Hannah Noyes who may have been his daughter..8

Children of Ebenezer Drury and Lucy Flint

Citations

  1. [S29] Paul Noyes' research, online noyes.rootsweb.com.
  2. [S300] Edmund Rice Website, online www.widowmaker.com/~gwk/era.
  3. [S1103] Birth Record.
  4. [S830] Early VR Worcester Co. MA (published), Vital records of Shrewsbury.
  5. [S742] Howe Genealogy, online.
  6. [S1110]
  7. [S145] VR of Massachusetts (published).
  8. [S669] 1850 United States Federal Census, MA, Roll M432_343, p. 239-240.
Last Edited=11 Mar 2017

Lucy Flint1,2

b. 27 November 1769, d. 8 July 1859
     Lucy Flint was born on 27 November 1769 in Shrewsbury, Province of Massachusetts Bay.1,2 She was the daughter of Dr. Edward Flint and Mary Howe.3,1,2 Lucy Flint married Ebenezer Drury, son of Ebenezer Drury and Hannah Keyes, on 3 January 1793 in Shrewsbury, Worcester County, Massachusetts.1,2,3 Lucy Flint died on 8 July 1859 in Brandon, Rutland County, Vermont, at age 89.4
     She and Ebenezer Drury appeared on the 1850 Federal census of Shrewsbury, Worcester County, Massachusetts, enumerated 7 September 1850 He was living in the household of Hannah Noyes who may have been his daughter..5

Children of Lucy Flint and Ebenezer Drury

Citations

  1. [S830] Early VR Worcester Co. MA (published), Vital records of Shrewsbury.
  2. [S742] Howe Genealogy, online.
  3. [S29] Paul Noyes' research, online noyes.rootsweb.com.
  4. [S745] NA, "Marriages and Deaths."
  5. [S669] 1850 United States Federal Census, MA, Roll M432_343, p. 239-240.
Last Edited=13 Nov 2016

Ebenezer Drury1,2

b. 17 January 1733/34, d. 19 August 1819
     Ebenezer Drury was born on 17 January 1733/34 in Shrewsbury, Province of Massachusetts Bay.1 He was the son of Daniel Drury and Sarah Flagg.2,1 Ebenezer Drury was baptized on 13 February 1733/34 in Shrewsbury, Province of Massachusetts Bay. Cutter says Feb 17th.1,2 Marriage banns for Ebenezer Drury were published on 26 September 1761 in Shrewsbury, Province of Massachusetts Bay.1 He married as his first wife Hannah Keyes, daughter of Ebenezer Keyes and Tamar Wheelock, on 24 October 1761 in Shrewsbury, Province of Massachusetts Bay, The marriage intentions were published September 26, 1761.3,1,2 Ebenezer Drury married as his second wife Thankful Scott circa 1778 in Pittsford, Republic of Vermont, now Rutland County.1,4 Ebenezer Drury married as his third wife Mercy Jackson on 28 February 1792 in Pittsford, Rutland County, Vermont.5,1 Ebenezer Drury died on 19 August 1819 in Pittsford, Rutland County, Vermont, at age 85.6,1,7 He was buried in Old Baptist, Pittsford, Rutland County, Vermont.8,1
     Ebenezer saw service several times during the Revolutionary War. He was in Col. Artemus Ward's company that marched on the alarm at of April 19, 1775. He also served with several other divisions between 1775 and 1778.9 He was a magistrate in Republic of Vermont.8 He appeared on the census of 1790 in Pittsford, Rutland County, Vermont. The household consisted of 3 males over 16, 4 males under 16 and 2 females.10

Children of Ebenezer Drury and Hannah Keyes

Children of Ebenezer Drury and Thankful Scott

Child of Ebenezer Drury and Mercy Jackson

Citations

  1. [S300] Edmund Rice Website, online www.widowmaker.com/~gwk/era.
  2. [S152] New England Families, online.
  3. [S830] Early VR Worcester Co. MA (published), Vital records of Shrewsbury.
  4. [S145] VR of Massachusetts (published).
  5. [S1091] Marriage Record.
  6. [S314]
  7. [S653] Biography/Burial Data, online www.findagrave.com.
  8. [S150] Warren Forsythe, "My main 55000-plus kinfolk file", July 26, 2005, unverified.
  9. [S24] Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors in the War of the Revolution, online.
  10. [S663] 1790 United States Federal Census, VT Roll: M637_12; Image: 0179.
  11. [S1103] Birth Record.
Last Edited=11 Mar 2017